Inner-City Kids: Adolescents Confront Life and Violence in an Urban Community

Inner-City Kids: Adolescents Confront Life and Violence in an Urban Community

Inner-City Kids: Adolescents Confront Life and Violence in an Urban Community

Inner-City Kids: Adolescents Confront Life and Violence in an Urban Community

Synopsis

The significance of the city of Jerusalem to the world's Muslims, Christians, and Jews cannot be overstated. Jerusalem: Caught in Time captures a bygone era in this holy city, allowing the reader to become acquainted with the city as it was a century ago.

Based on a treasure chest of photographs from the archives of the Plestine Exploration fund, this beautifully illustrated volume presents a compilation of images from the middle of hte nineteenth century until the First World War. collected with the aim of recording the most minute details of the city and the surrounding area, they include the first photographic survey of Jerusalem and present a unique record of the country. Rather than viewing Jerusalem trough a political, religious, or missionary lens, the photographs chronicle everything from archeological digs to the ordinary people of the city going about their daily business.

The photographs and accompanying text of Jerusalem: Caught in time provide a remarkable window into the Jerusalem of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and reveal the true face of the city and its people.

Excerpt

I was introduced to the principal of the Blair School, an innercity public school located in the northeast region of the United States, in September 1997. A community activist I had met when I relocated to the area encouraged me to speak with the principal about my ideas of developing a participatory action research (PAR) project with a group of middle-school students aimed at exploring how they negotiate their daily lives within an inner-city community. Mrs. Lawton, an energetic African American principal, was receptive to my ideas and within minutes, introduced me to Mrs. Leslie, an African American science teacher at the Blair School. At the time, Mrs. Leslie was also the homeroom teacher for the students in Homeroom 211. Like Mrs. Lawton, Susan (Mrs. Leslie) was very interested in a collaborative project and invited me outside to meet “her babies.” We stood outside in the school garden—a contained space of soil and seed that is cared for by the sixth-grade students. Susan had spearheaded the creation of the garden many years ago and each year there is a new group of students who rake, plant, weed, and learn the dos and don'ts of growing vegetables, flowers, and other mysterious living matter that appears every season. As we stood near the garden, Susan invited the students to listen to my proposal, reminding me that the decision was up to the students—if they wanted to participate, she and they would commit to every . . .

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