The Clash of Globalisations: Neo-Liberalism, the Third Way, and Anti-Globalisation

The Clash of Globalisations: Neo-Liberalism, the Third Way, and Anti-Globalisation

The Clash of Globalisations: Neo-Liberalism, the Third Way, and Anti-Globalisation

The Clash of Globalisations: Neo-Liberalism, the Third Way, and Anti-Globalisation

Synopsis

This work addresses the politics of globalisation through an examination of neo-liberalism, the third way, and anti-capitalist responses and alternatives. It utilises a Marxist approach, not only to challenge the claims made by apologists for 'actually existing globalisation', but to explain, contextualise and problematise the rise of anti-globalisation politics. Central to the work is a critique of globalisation theory, neo-liberalism and the third way; an examination of the role of the state as an agent of globalisation, particularly the hegemonic US state; a theorisation of the nature of uneven development in the global order; and an examination of the political implications of these issues for progressive alternatives to neo-liberal globalisation. Ray Kiely, Ph. D. (1991) in Sociology, University of Warwick, is Senior Lecturer in Development Studies, SOAS, University of London. He has published widely in the fields of globalisation and development, including Sociology and Development (UCL Press, 1995) and The Ends of Globalisation: US Hegemony and the Globalist Project (forthcoming, 2005).

Excerpt

From the 1990s onwards, globalisation became the key concept, both in academic debate and in mainstream political discourse. In the Western world, it came to be closely associated with the ThirdWay political project, which proposed a radical centre ground that transcended statist socialism (in its Stalinist and social-democratic forms) and neo-liberal market fundamentalism. Globalisation was a term commonly used by Bill Clinton and Tony Blair in particular, and, in Britain at least, academic debate and political project embraced, through the work of Anthony Giddens. In the advanced capitalist countries, the idea of a new economy was championed, in which the old boombust cycles of industrial capitalism were replaced by ongoing economic growth boosted by the information-led, 'new economy'. At the same time, it was claimed that the developing world could get in on the act too, through the adoption of liberal policies that would attract investment, boost trade, and promote long-term growth. Initially, such investment would be based on the attraction of cheap labour, as this was how the West had developed, and, in the long run, increased investment would promote economic growth, and with this growth higher wages and better living conditions would result.

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