The Architecture of Imperialism: Military Bases and the Evolution of Foreign Policy in Egypt's New Kingdom

The Architecture of Imperialism: Military Bases and the Evolution of Foreign Policy in Egypt's New Kingdom

The Architecture of Imperialism: Military Bases and the Evolution of Foreign Policy in Egypt's New Kingdom

The Architecture of Imperialism: Military Bases and the Evolution of Foreign Policy in Egypt's New Kingdom

Synopsis

This volume traces the evolution of New Kingdom foreign policy in Syria-Palestine, Nubia, and Libya through an analysis of the distribution of Egyptian military bases over time and across borders. Archaeological and textual evidence pertaining to fortress-towns, forts, border checkpoints, and military headquarters is analyzed in order to illuminate the ever-shifting strategies employed by the Egyptian government to rule its subject territories. Exhaustive in its scope and illustrated throughout with numerous maps and architectural plans, this book should interest Egyptologists, Near Eastern archaeologists and historians, as well as anthropologists engaged in the comparative study of early empires and military tactics.

Excerpt

Given the ever-expanding corpus of work focusing on Egypt's imperial interests during the New Kingdom (c. 1550 to 1069 B.C.), it is only with the best of excuses that one may venture in good faith to add to it. General books and articles exist, as do works focusing on the empire in Syria-Palestine, Libya, or Nubia. Within these broad categories, scholars have studied military, economic, and administrative topics as well as specific time periods, certain archaeological sites, and aspects of imperial terminology. While such works have added immeasurably to our understanding of Egyptian imperialism in the New Kingdom, their very proliferation highlights the complexity of the topic as well as the contentious dialogue it often provokes.

My own excuse for introducing this work into the mix is that despite such prodigious scholarship in the field of New Kingdom foreign relations, no one has yet attempted a cross-frontier investigation of the military bases that housed imperial functionaries and troops. During the New Kingdom, the pharaonic administration erected

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