Integrative Assessment of Adult Personality

Integrative Assessment of Adult Personality

Integrative Assessment of Adult Personality

Integrative Assessment of Adult Personality

Synopsis

"Now in a fully revised and expanded second edition, this landmark work gives students and clinicians a solid grounding in the most widely used approaches to adult personality assessment. Unlike most other assessment texts, the volume goes beyond providing state-of-the-science coverage of specific instruments to delineate a framework for integrating data from a variety of sources. The focus is on using test results go construct a "moving picture" that takes the complexities of the individual personality into account, serves as the basis for a rational treatment plan, and facilitates meaningful reporting and client feedback. Restructured and thoroughly rewritten to reflect the latest findings and approaches in the field, the second edition features an extended case example that brings key concepts to life. Authoritative and up to date, this volume is an ideal text or advanced undergraduate- and graduate-level courses. It is also an essential reference and guide for clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, clinical social workers, and others conducting assessments in a range of professional settings." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

This book addresses the task of developing integrated adult psychological assessments. As such, we hope it will fill an important need for both established practitioners and students. Most books on assessment provide information on test construction, various tests, and interpretations of patterns of scores. However, they do not provide concepts, strategies, and guidelines on how to combine this information into a coherent interpretation and a problem-oriented psychological report and treatment plan. Instead, concepts and strategies are based on single dimensions or single tests. This single-dimension approach is likely to result in invalid conclusions and incorrect predictions. The conclusions will be invalid not because of anything inherently faulty in the source of information or in the accuracy of the observations, but because a single source or type of information is limited in how accurately it reflects real-world experience.

The above situation is similar to the well-known metaphor about the blind men who were trying to determine the nature of an elephant by touching a part of it. The blind man who touched the long trunk concluded that the elephant was one thing; the blind man touching the leathery and wide leg of the elephant concluded that it must be something else again. Each of the blind men might have been quite accurate in describing what he had touched. None, however, was correct in drawing a generalization about the creature based on what he had touched. They were not correct because they had obtained useful but insufficient (unintegrated) data. The data we collect during the process of personality assessment are useful to the extent we can translate the “snapshots” derived from each instrument into an accurate “moving picture” of the patient or client.

Personality assessment, as a general rule of thumb, is not based on a single issue or observation. An individual's assessment should not be based . . .

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