Traditions in World Cinema

Traditions in World Cinema

Traditions in World Cinema

Traditions in World Cinema

Synopsis

The core volume in the Traditions in World Cinema series, this book brings together a colourful and wide-ranging collection of world cinematic traditions - national, regional and global - all of which are in need of introduction, investigation and, in some cases, critical reassessment. Topics include: German expressionism, Italian neorealism, French New Wave, British new wave, Czech new wave, Danish Dogma, post-Communist cinema, Brazilian post-Cinema Novo, new Argentine cinema, pre-revolutionary African traditions, Israeli persecution films, new Iranian cinema, Hindi film songs, Chinese wenyi pian melodrama, Japanese horror, new Hollywood cinema and global found footage cinema. Features
• Includes a preface by Toby Miller.
• Each chapter covers a key world cinema tradition and is written by an expert in the field: Roy Armes, Nitzan Ben-Shaul, Peter Bondanella, Corey Creekmur, Adrian Danks, Peter Hames, Randal Johnson, Robert Kolker, Myrto Konstantarakos, Jay McRoy, Negar Mottahedeh, Richard Neupert, Christina Stojanova, J. P. Telotte, Stephen Teo.
• Traditions are examined from a wide range of views and include historical, social, cultural and industrial perspectives.

Excerpt

Perhaps the most important thing to do when thinking about 'world cinema' is to destabilise the term, to question the logic of each word. Clearly, the concept is designed to go beyond two central rubrics for film followers, critics and historians: national cinema and Hollywood. In this sense it is to be welcomed. But it also buys into the semantic field of 'world music', a tidy agglomeration that suits the marketing and governing principles of major multinational industrial concerns but deracinates the cultural histories and conflicts that make possible its very components. 'World' is not so much a sign of a cosmopolitan relativism, where diverse cultures are permitted promiscuous interplay, as it is a sign that massive changes in population, and the emergence of a New International Division of Cultural Labor, have generated affluent audiences equipped to enjoy a mélange of difference under the jurisdiction of a small number of corporate conglomerates. 'Cinema' is equally problematic, given that most 'films' are viewed on television sets via broadcast, cable, satellite, tape or disk, while the future of 'film' creation and reception seems likely to be digital. China provides the first major data on the appeal of movies in 'digital' versus 'film' theatres, and the difference is clear (see table overleaf).

But the idea of long-form recorded drama available via audiovisual technology, sometimes for collective, anonymous consumption and sometimes for domestic, familiar consumption, remains. While we must be careful not to lump together distinctly different producing and viewing formats and experiences, the term 'cinema' may well continue to describe something that makes sense to audiences, gaffers, censors, culturecrats, newspaper editors and critics.

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