Public Relations: Theory and Practice

Public Relations: Theory and Practice

Public Relations: Theory and Practice

Public Relations: Theory and Practice

Synopsis

This leading introductory student text has been completely revised. With new examples, new information on digital strategies and on community relations, it reflects best contemporary practice in this increasingly influential profession. Public relations is a dynamic and rapidly growing field which offers a variety of career paths. Whether you're developing the public image of an organization, dealing with the media or managing issues for a large company, you need strong communication skills and a sound understanding of public relations processes. Richly illustrated with examples and case studies from Australia, New Zealand, Asia and other countries, Public Relations is an ideal starting point for anyone developing a career in public relations.

Excerpt

In this chapter
What is public relations?
Defining public relations
The role of public relations practitioners
Public relations activities
Relationship to marketing and advertising
From publics to markets
Skills needed in public relations
Public relations: Art, science, business?
The development of public relations as a profession
The new edition: Corporate social responsibility and being digital
Conclusions and looking forward

What is public relations?

One of the most common questions asked by first-time public relations students is: 'What is public relations?' Students are not the only ones unsure of the boundaries of the profession. The term 'public relations' is often misunderstood, leaving many people—including senior management—unsure of the profession's parameters. One reason for the confusion is that it is often used inappropriately. For example, Queensland's Gold Coast meter maids—attractive women in very short skirts or bikinis who walk around the main streets of Surfers Paradise and put coins into parking meters that are about to expire, thus helping motorists (often visitors from interstate) to avoid a fine and giving them a good impression of the holiday city—have described their job as being in 'public relations'. Further confusion comes from the enormous array of titles used to describe jobs in the field: in 1994, a total of 74 different titles were used in job advertisements for people performing public relations roles (Foster . . .

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