The Deepest South: The United States, Brazil, and the African Slave Trade

The Deepest South: The United States, Brazil, and the African Slave Trade

The Deepest South: The United States, Brazil, and the African Slave Trade

The Deepest South: The United States, Brazil, and the African Slave Trade

Synopsis

This volume analyzes the nature of the law school in the university environment, confronting the tension between the vision of law school as a training ground for new lawyers versus the vision of law school place for original scholarship and academic discourse. In examining the role of the law school in modern society, sections are devoted to a myriad of controversial areas of legal study, such as feminist theory, race theory, and post-modernism. This volume offers scholars of legal education a map to the future of law schools.

Excerpt

This book is about the relationship between the two great slave empires of the 19th century—the U.S. and Brazil—in the context of the African Slave Trade, with the accent decidedly on North America. This is not a book about slavery in Brazil; though the narrative engages four continents, the primary focus is on the U.S., more specifically, the role of U.S. nationals as slave traders and sojourners in Brazil; i.e., this book is also a social history about the impact of Brazil on the U.S. It is very much a story that involves Brazil (and Africa) in the eyes of the U.S.—and not vice versa, and it is very much a story about the role of U.S. nationals in the African Slave Trade. It is also a story about the continuing rivalry between London and Washington that had exploded in war in 1812 and then festered as the U.K. abolished slavery in the Empire in the 1830s.

This book argues that U.S. slavery is better understood in hemispheric terms—the Slave South saw in an alliance with Brazil a formidable hedge against a future relationship with the North and, for that matter, a hedge against continuing pressure from London to abolish slavery, a hedge that could mean triumph in a Civil War, if need be.

Two leading characters in these pages are former Virginia Governor, Henry Wise—John Brown's executioner—and Matthew Fontaine Maury, a Virginian of a stature comparable to Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. As Minister to Brazil, Wise crusaded vigorously against the illicit slave trade to Brazil, while Maury advocated strongly for deporting enslaved U.S. Negroes to the Amazon for the purpose of developing this region; he was also part of a cabal that had designs on seizing the Amazon from Brazil: their ostensibly separate initiatives are best comprehended in unison, i.e., if Brazil could draw upon the labor of enslaved African-Americans, there would be no need to draw upon the illicit trade, which was dominated by forces in the U.S. Northeast and their lust for Brazilian territory was of a piece with their boundless . . .

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