The Educator's Guide to Assessing and Improving School Discipline Programs

The Educator's Guide to Assessing and Improving School Discipline Programs

The Educator's Guide to Assessing and Improving School Discipline Programs

The Educator's Guide to Assessing and Improving School Discipline Programs

Synopsis

As every educator knows, even the best-performing schools have occasional discipline issues. In The Educator's Guide to Assessing and Improving School Discipline Programs, Mark and Christine Boynton provide a framework for preventing as many discipline problems as possible-and for dealing with them effectively when they do arise.

Excerpt

We believe that every school should have a standing discipline committee to assemble the written rules after obtaining input from staff, resolve discipline-related issues as they arise, and keep discipline on the front burner at all times. The committee should include a representative from each grade level and content area, as well as from classified, specialist, and support staff members. Ideally, committee members should be good communicators and should represent their constituent groups rather than advocate their personal positions. To this end, it is better for constituent groups to elect their committee representatives.

Identifying Core Beliefs

Assessing the Philosophy

Each staff member should assess his or her personal discipline philosophy and submit it to the school discipline committee for analysis. Although teachers can assess their philosophies independently of one another, it is best for them to do so at the same time, in a facilitated setting, using the form in Figure 1.1. The main purpose of the assessment is to find areas of agreement and disagreement among staff members so that they can be proactively addressed.

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