The Global Family Planning Revolution: Three Decades of Population Policies and Programs

The Global Family Planning Revolution: Three Decades of Population Policies and Programs

The Global Family Planning Revolution: Three Decades of Population Policies and Programs

The Global Family Planning Revolution: Three Decades of Population Policies and Programs

Synopsis

This book brings together the latest thinking about poverty dynamics from diverse analytic traditions. While covering a vast body of conceptual and empirical knowledge about economic and social mobility, the ten chapters take the reader on compelling journeys of multigenerational accounts of three villages in Kanartaka, India; twelve years in the life of a street child in Burkina Faso; a shorter term comparative examination of country-wide experiences with mobility in rich nations; and much more. The authors--leading development practitioners and scholars from the fields of anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology--critically examine the literature from their disciplines and contribute new frameworks and evidence from their own works. problems differ, the organizational structures and behavior-modification campaigns needed can learn much from the pioneering efforts at reducing fertility.

Excerpt

This book was conceived with the conviction that the historic emergence of national family planning programs should be brought back to the world's attention. As a new social instrument to address a new social problem, the family planning program swept much of the developing world in the 1960s. We felt that the memory of this vital experience was in danger of being lost; it deserved to be captured in a definitive fashion, partly for young people unaware of the programs' origins, partly for the historical record, and partly for lessons that apply to other spheres of concern. The story of the appearance, for the first time in human history, of organized national programs devoted to the challenge of excessive and unwanted fertility should not be lost but should be mined for the lessons those programs might teach. This collection of essays was undertaken to answer that need.

The years just after 1960 saw the appearance of a new fertility determinant— organized actions by whole societies to bring birthrates down to match falling death rates, and to ease the accompanying dislocations faced by educational, medical, economic, housing, and family system institutions, and others. Those actions were also meant to give women greater control over their own childbearing, and to relieve families from the unexpected burdens of raising more surviving children than in the past. The two results together, societal benefits and personal benefits, flowed from programs based on new contraceptive technologies that could be deployed to whole populations. This book sets forth the stories of those social and technological breakthroughs as they emerged in very diverse country circumstances.

The financial generosity of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, supplemented by a gift from John Snow Inc. and a gift from an anonymous donor have made this book possible, while the Population Research Institute of the Pennsylvania State University kindly provided the necessary institutional linkage. We are especially indebted to the World Bank, which made an exception to its usual practice and entertained the inclusion of an outside publishing project, and we thank Tony Measham for recognizing and encouraging the possibility. Many persons have helped with this project in many different ways and we can only list a few of them: Edward Bos, Carol Carpenter–Yaman, Gordon DeJong, Jane Delung, Peter Donaldson, Alice Faintich, Mary Fisk, Robert Gillespie, Gavin Jones, Jack Kantner, Joel Lamstein, Richard Leete . . .

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