Social Constructionist Psychology: A Critical Analysis of Theory and Practice

Synopsis

• How can ideas about the social construction of reality be reconciled with the material and embodied aspects of our being?

• In what ways can a realist framework inform social constructionist research?

• What are the limits of social constructionism?

This accessible text draws together for the first time a wide range of emerging issues, ideas and discussions in constructionist psychology. It shows how these issues are relevant to everyday life, using carefully-chosen examples to illustrate its arguments, and provides a coherent and challenging introduction to the field.
The book explores the growing conviction that dominant 'discursive' trends in social constructionism - which deal with the analysis of language and discourse to the exclusion of the material world, embodiment, personal-social history, and power - are inadequate or incomplete and risk preventing social constructionism from maturing into a viable and coherent body of theory, method and practice. In highlighting what are seen as deficiencies in current constructionist approaches, it inevitably takes a somewhat critical stance. However, the contributing authors are committed to a constructionist analysis of the human condition - into which they seek to reintegrate the material and embodied aspects of our nature. As a result, the completion of social constructionism is brought a step closer and its continued importance is underlined.

Additional information

Includes content by:
  • John Cromby
  • David J. Nightingale
  • Ian Parker
  • Carla Willig
  • Mike Michael
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Philadelphia
Publication year:
  • 1999

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