National Days/National Ways: Historical, Political, and Religious Celebrations around the World

National Days/National Ways: Historical, Political, and Religious Celebrations around the World

National Days/National Ways: Historical, Political, and Religious Celebrations around the World

National Days/National Ways: Historical, Political, and Religious Celebrations around the World

Synopsis

A team of unique contributors describes the internal and external repercussions of holidays and celebrations in more than a dozen countries.

Excerpt

Linda K. Fuller

Whatever its origins, the nation has involved a complex and rarely consistent mix
ture of geography, language, custom, law, religion, economy, race, and collective
will… [it] has been for some time now a powerful and effective way of respond
ing to both objective social needs and subjective feelings of collective solidarity.

—Vincent P. Pécora, Nations and Identities

With daily media reminders about the role of nationalism around the world, the human and political rights of communication become ever more critical. As communication scholars interested in the intersection of nation-building with media support systems of journalism and public relations, development, patriotism, rhetoric, and propaganda, global events demand our examination of how individual countries organize to celebrate their nationalism.

The literature on nationalism is wide-ranging. Some studies deal with histories (e.g., Barthel, 1996; Emerson, 1960; Greenfield, 1992; Hobsbawm, 1992; Kohn, 1962; Minahan, 1996), others with its role as a force in politics (e.g., Beiner, 2003; Gillis, 1994; Hutchinson and Smith, 1994; Kellas, 1991; Pye, 1963; Spencer, 1998), in problem areas (e.g., Brown, 2000; Keating, 1990; Wilson and Donnan, 1998), in economics (e.g., Furedi, 1994), in psychological circumstances (e.g., Kecmanovic, 1996), in philosophy and religion (e.g., Gilbert, 1998; Hastings, 1997; Marty and Appleby, 1997; O'Brien, 1988), law (Malnes, 1994), and of course in terms of ethnicity (e.g., Bentley, 1981; Diamond and Plattner, 1994; Farner, 1994; Kruger, 1993; McNeill, 1986; Shafir, 1995; Smith, 1986, 2004; Wimmer, 2002), gender (e.g., Cohen, 1995; Moghadam, 1994; Wilson and Frederiksen, 1995), rhetoric (e.g., Bhabha, 1990); ethics (e.g., Moore, 2001), and communication issues (e.g., McKim and McMahan, 1997; Schnapper, 1998; Schramm, 1964; Williams, 2002). While the writings of Karl W. Deutsch (1953/1966), Benedict Anderson (1983), and Anthony . . .

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