A Systemic Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa: Women in Transition

A Systemic Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa: Women in Transition

A Systemic Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa: Women in Transition

A Systemic Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa: Women in Transition

Synopsis

"Written in an accessible and jargon-free way, this original approach to working with women who have bulimia nervosa is based on research showing that bulimia involves interpersonal, social and societal factors as well as the cognitive, developmental and behavioural aspects that have been the focus of much professional intervention to date. Carole Kayrooz shows how people seeking to understand and emotionally support women with this complex problem need to be able to work with all these dimensions. Her book is one of the first to interpret the disorder within a systems framework and to present a detailed systemic model for its treatment. By applying systems theory to the problem, the author highlights its contextual nature. The practical application of this multi-dimensional, system-based understanding to treatment practice is demonstrated through three in-depth case studies. This book is essential reading for psychologists, counsellors, therapists, social workers, and health professionals working with this group, as well as for people suffering from bulimia nervosa and their families." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

…it's important that therapists know that anorexia and bulimia
have to be dealt with on a number of different levels, that you
can't just focus on the individual. What's happening for them or
what's happening in the family or what's happening in the envi
ronment or society is all important together. You have to deal with
it on all levels or else you are dealing with just part of what the
problem is and I think it'll always come back if you don't (Letter
from bulimic woman; Epston and Madigan 1995, p.8).

The 'thin ideal' and weight dissatisfaction

In a society where food is abundant, it is not surprising that the average weight of women has increased. Yet the weight of the ideal body type, as portrayed in the media, has actually decreased (Logue 1991; Murphy 1997). While many women know that the 'thin ideal' is unrealistic, they remain unhappy with their body weight and shape (Stevens and Tiggemann 1998). This is because the 'thin ideal' has come to symbolise success, social status, wealth and self-discipline (Stice and Shaw 1994). Weight has become a quick and tangible measure of women's self-worth, desirability and ranking in relation to other women (Lacey and Birtchnell 1985).

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.