Clinical Textbook of Addictive Disorders

Clinical Textbook of Addictive Disorders

Clinical Textbook of Addictive Disorders

Clinical Textbook of Addictive Disorders

Synopsis

"Now in a revised and expanded third edition, this authoritative volume presents state-of-the-science knowledge about all aspects of addictive disorders and their treatment. Leading researchers and practitioners describe best practices in assessment and diagnosis and provide the latest tools for working with users of specific substances. Updated throughout and featuring a wealth of useful new material, this is an indispensable text for anyone studying or treating these prevalent and highly challenging problems. Timely and comprehensive, this volume belongs on the desks of practitioners, graduate students, and residents in a range of disciplines, including psychiatry, clinical psychology, social work, substance abuse counseling, and allied health fields. It serves as a core text for courses in addiction psychiatry and substance abuse counseling." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

This third edition of the Clinical Textbook of Addictive Disorders appears 20 years after the founding of the American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP). During this period, major progress has occurred in both general psychiatry and addiction psychiatry. There has been movement ranging from description of the phenomenology of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs), to the beginnings of understanding neurobiological mechanisms, pathophysiology, genetic and family influences, and etiology. Addiction treatment research, including that for comorbid conditions, has advanced and the development of evidence-based guidelines for addiction treatment has been launched. While treatment methods are still very much tied to the craft and art of psychotherapy (including self-help and spirituality), dissemination of research findings and evidence-based treatment approaches will add to the quality of care of patients.

Unfortunately, our advances in the understanding of addiction psychiatry are not necessarily associated with reductions in the incidence of substance use. The magnitude of use seems to be subject to fads and fluctuations in perceptions of risk of use. Over the past 30 years there have been important variations in the use of substances by age, gender, ethnic, and racial groups. The most recent estimate on the cost of substance use is for 1998, with the cost of drug abuse directly estimated at $143.4 billion (Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2001) and the costs of alcohol abuse projected to be $185 billion (Harwood, 2000). This figure (estimated in 1992) reflects the estimated 8.3% of the population ages 12 or older who were current illicit drug users in 2002 and perhaps also includes the 2.6% of the population ages 12 or older who were current users of psychotherapeutic drugs taken nonmedically in 2002. The rate of current drug use among adolescents in 2002 was 11.6%, but that rate was surpassed by young adults (ages 18–25 years) at 20.2%. As for alcohol, an estimated 120 million Americans ages 12 or older reported being current drinkers . . .

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