Making Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Work: Clinical Process for New Practitioners

Making Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Work: Clinical Process for New Practitioners

Making Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Work: Clinical Process for New Practitioners

Making Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Work: Clinical Process for New Practitioners

Synopsis

"Despite extensive training, many beginning clinicians still feel uncertain about the process of therapy. This practical, user-friendly primer is specifically designed for novice cognitive-behavioral therapists and those skilled in other models who are now turning to CBT in their practice. Filling the gap between academic learning and the knowledge needed for day-to-day work, it provides a concise, readily accessible guide to the overall treatment framework that makes CBT so effective. From intake to termination, the entire process of CBT is brought to life in this indispensable, hands-on guide. It belongs on the desks of clinicians, students, interns, and residents across the full range of mental health disciplines, and will fill a unique niche as a primary or supplemental text in graduate-level courses and clinical practica." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Every professional must do things for a first time. Architects must build their first building, teachers must teach their first class, surgeons must perform their first surgery. Similarly, beginning cognitive-behavioral clinicians must see their first clients. Learning new skills and beginning to develop in one's chosen profession can be very exciting, but these experiences can also be anxiety-provoking. One reason is that much of our work is unpredictable. At the beginning of a course of therapy, it is impossible to know whether or not clients will benefit. Many factors contribute to the outcome of therapy, and we are not able to manipulate all of these factors in a way that will guarantee a positive outcome. There are ways, however, to contend with this uncertainty.

The main goal of this book is to help beginning clinicians develop a sense of greater confidence and control as they start to work with clients. Throughout, we offer four main ways in which to gain this greater sense of confidence and control: engaging in preparation, understanding the process of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), being mindful of possible difficulties, and making good use of supervision.

Preparation

The first thing that beginning clinicians can do in order to feel more confident about work with clients is to engage in adequate preparation. In some sense, “adequate preparation” is defined by one's training program, where specific requirements must be completed before trainees in-

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