Networked Art

Networked Art

Networked Art

Networked Art

Excerpt

Still in the midst of a new art's dawn, we can look back at its emergence in the twentieth century's last decades. Unlike all the other arts, including film and literature, this new art, intensified by access to the Internet, is not defined by any medium's form. It is not a thing like a painting, printed poem, or film. It is a situation: networked art. One initial example will highlight the characteristics of this new terrain. Since the late 1980s, J. S. G. Boggs has drawn versions of currencies, including the U.S. dollar bill. His work has drawn the negative attention of government agencies investigating counterfeiting, including cases against him in Australia, Great Britain, and the United States. The controversy surrounding his work has focused on the similitude of his meticulous drawings to the official bills, and critics have discussed his work as a provocation to reconsider the value of art and the value of money (Weschler). For Boggs, the artworks include, and are more concerned with, the transactions involved in trying to use the bills to purchase food and merchandise. His art uses the trappings of a large bureaucratic system to create an intimate community among those involved in the transactions. Typically, the final artwork consists of a framed collection of the receipt for payment, the proper change (which Boggs later sells to the collector), and the drawing used to make the purchase. The collector uses the receipt and other clues to track down the person who knowingly accepted a Boggs bill for the . . .

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