The Graffiti of Pharaonic Egypt: Scope and Roles of Informal Writings (C. 3100-332 B.C.)

The Graffiti of Pharaonic Egypt: Scope and Roles of Informal Writings (C. 3100-332 B.C.)

The Graffiti of Pharaonic Egypt: Scope and Roles of Informal Writings (C. 3100-332 B.C.)

The Graffiti of Pharaonic Egypt: Scope and Roles of Informal Writings (C. 3100-332 B.C.)

Synopsis

Graffiti, being a form of written communication invariably free of social restraints, are a far more accurate reflection of the character of the Egyptian era of the pharaohs than the far more polished artistic or literary works. This book is the first overall attempt to offer insight into more than 2800 years of Egyptian and Nubian hieroglyphic and hieratic graffiti. Graffiti have long been neglected when compared to larger and more formal texts and inscriptions, and it is only in recent years that many important graffiti texts written in these scripts have been published and made available to wider scrutiny. For this work, extensive use has also been made of materials as yet unpublished. All this taken together makes Dr. Alex Peden's work a valuable guide to normal life and society in Ancient Egypt.

Excerpt

The following study is an attempt to collect, describe and evaluate the recorded graffiti texts from Pharaonic Egypt and Nubia which were written in the hieroglyphic or hieratic scripts. It seems an opportune moment to undertake such an investigation. Not only have these texts tended to be neglected when compared to larger and more formal historical inscriptions, but it is only in recent years that many important graffiti texts written in these scripts have been published and so made accessible to wider scrutiny. Furthermore, a substantial amount of material still exists only in the private notebooks of long-dead scholars and this being the case I have made a particular effort to include such unpublished material whenever it was available to me.

Of course I cannot claim to have discussed every last known hieroglyphic and hieratic graffito from ancient Egypt and Nubia. Such a task would have been all but impossible. Indeed in the manner of painting the Forth Road Bridge it would have been never ending. New epigraphic discoveries are being made all the time and many textual graffiti remain unpublished. However, I have endeavoured to survey the great majority of all recorded graffiti texts and to that end this account might be deemed, if by no means complete, then reasonably comprehensive.

Many individuals merit recognition for their assistance in the preparation of this book. My long-suffering parents are due a particular thanks for their unflagging support on what has been a very long journey. Likewise my former research supervisor Prof. Kenneth. A. Kitchen has aided and encouraged me with his characteristic generosity. It has been a pleasure and a privilege to have worked with such a scholar. My debt of gratitude to him is inestimable. I would also like to acknowledge my indebtedness to Heather Lyons in Edinburgh for her support.

I note with great affection the courtesy shown me by the late Dr. Abdel-Aziz F. Sadek. His death was a cruel blow to all who knew him. To Drs. Jiro Kondo and Takao Kikuchi of Waseda University, Tokyo, very special thanks are due for information on new graffiti texts in the West Valley of the Kings, located and

Suffice it to quote G. T. Martin, The Tomb of Tia and Tia. A Royal Monument
of the Ramesside Period in the Memphite Necropolis (1997), 30 n. 3.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.