The End of Charity: Time for Social Enterprise

The End of Charity: Time for Social Enterprise

The End of Charity: Time for Social Enterprise

The End of Charity: Time for Social Enterprise

Synopsis

Nic Frances is a social entrepreneur. He once worked for charity. This is the story of how he came to understand that charity can never deliver a just and sustainable world. It is only through a value-centered market economy that we will ever see real social change. Breaking new ground and drawing on his encounters with business and social leaders around the world as well as his own richly-lived experiences, Nic Frances leads us through his principles of social entrepreneurship. He introduces us to the powerful idea that the market can be a tool for delivering a range of values besides profit. He explains the growing recognition that corporate social responsibility benefits businesses as well as the community and that welfare organizations will only be really effective when they start exploring social enterprise and corporate partnerships. The End of Charity is as hopeful and as it is inspiring. It heralds a breakthrough to lasting change to the seemingly intractable problems of poverty, injustice, and environmental sustainability. It is a book for everybody who cares about the future.

Excerpt

This book aims to engender a new dialogue: a dialogue about creating the conditions under which business, government, the welfare sector and individuals can address the problems of poverty, inequality and environmental sustainability in order to grapple with these issues effectively we as a society must reclaim the word value as a term that reflects what we hold as desirable and important—the things and ideas for which we choose to strive. We need to move beyond notions of charity and welfare, beyond do-gooding and guilt, to a system that recognises the complexity of our values and a realistic understanding of how we can support them. the way to do this, I believe, is to embrace what I have come to call value-centred market economics.

In recent times, we have become increasingly focused on valuing things in terms of money alone. Yet money is merely the mechanism we have chosen as a means to share and exchange things of value. in itself—without the objects, services or opportunities that it creates—money is worthless.

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