Rethinking Attachment for Early Childhood Practice: Promoting Security, Autonomy and Resilience in Young Children

Rethinking Attachment for Early Childhood Practice: Promoting Security, Autonomy and Resilience in Young Children

Rethinking Attachment for Early Childhood Practice: Promoting Security, Autonomy and Resilience in Young Children

Rethinking Attachment for Early Childhood Practice: Promoting Security, Autonomy and Resilience in Young Children

Synopsis

Although attachment theory has, in recent debates, been seen as anti–child care, this study rethinks this perception, demonstrating instead that understanding attachment is essential to good child care practice. A thorough explanation of attachment theory is provided along with explanations of how security, autonomy, and resilience in young children can be promoted in child care settings through a sound understanding of attachment principles. With examples drawn from practice, the author examines the relationships between children and those who care for them, between parents and those who care for their children, and among child care providers themselves.

Excerpt

One-year-old Eli is happily exploring toys on the floor around her.
She glances from time to time at other infants in her child-care room,
and at adults as they come and go, but most often she looks at
Zamia, her caregiver, as she moves around the room. Zamia smiles
and talks to Eli often, and is the main person who attends to Eli's
needs. Zamia frequently sits on the floor, and when she does, Eli
crawls over and climbs onto her lap. Zamia gently strokes Eli's back
as they play and chat together. Eli is settled and relaxed, attentive
to her environment and confident to explore it. Over the past eight
months in child care, Eli has formed a special relationship with
Zamia. She has learnt she can rely on her for comfort, reassurance,
encouragement and happy interactions. Zamia is Eli's special person
at child care. She is Eli's secure base.

Two-and-a-half-year-old Ryan is in his father's arms at the start
of his child-care day. His carer, Jung, walks over and stands chatting
briefly with Ryan and his dad, then puts her arms out to Ryan. At
first, Ryan leans away and cuddles into his dad, who speaks gently . . .

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