Teaching Other Voices: Women and Religion in Early Modern Europe

Teaching Other Voices: Women and Religion in Early Modern Europe

Teaching Other Voices: Women and Religion in Early Modern Europe

Teaching Other Voices: Women and Religion in Early Modern Europe

Synopsis

The books in The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe series chronicle the heretofore neglected stories of women between 1400 and 1700 with the aim of reviving scholarly interest in their thought as expressed in a full range of genres: treatises, orations, and history; lyric, epic, and dramatic poetry; novels and novellas; letters, biography, and autobiography; philosophy and science. Teaching Other Voices: Women and Religion in Early Modern Europe complements these rich volumes by identifying themes useful in literature, history, religion, women's studies, and introductory humanities courses. The volume's introduction, essays, and suggested course materials are intended as guides for teachers--but will serve the needs of students and scholars as well.

Excerpt

Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil Jr.

From 1350 to 1750, women as well as men were actively involved in Europe's religious struggles and aspirations. This introduction provides an overview of the religious history of the era, placing the religious experience of women specifically in the context of that standard narrative.

Many people think of the European Middle Ages as deeply religious, and the following period—the “Renaissance” or the “Early Modern”—as increasingly secular. On the contrary, the four centuries from 1350 to 1750 are a period of intense religious experience and institutional transformation. Consider the religious history of the period in fifty-year segments.

The period 1350–1400: As this period opens, the papacy is in its “Babylonian captivity” (1309–78). It has been removed from Rome to Avignon in Provence (modern France), a displacement signaling high tension between the papacy and secular politics throughout Europe. In 1378, the pope returns to Rome. His return, however, is followed by the “Great Schism” (1378– 1415), when different sets of interest groups affiliate themselves with two different popes. Meanwhile, in the Low Countries and north Germany, a religious movement of laymen known as the devotio moderna (“new devotion”) flourishes. It emphasizes personal responsibility in the pursuit of the religious

1. Among numerous overviews of the history of late-medieval Christianity and the Protestant
and Catholic reformations, these recent titles are usefully consulted: John Bossy, Christianity
in the West, 1400–1700 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988); Euan Cameron, The European
Reformation (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991); Diarmaid MacCullough, The Reformation: A History
(Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2004); Michael Mullett, The Catholic Reformation (London: Routledge,
1999); Bob Scribner, Roy Porter, and Mikulas Teich, eds., The Reformation in National Context
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994); James D. Tracy, Europe's Reformations, 1450–
1650 (Totowa: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999).

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.