Infants, Toddlers, and Families: A Framework for Support and Intervention

Infants, Toddlers, and Families: A Framework for Support and Intervention

Infants, Toddlers, and Families: A Framework for Support and Intervention

Infants, Toddlers, and Families: A Framework for Support and Intervention

Synopsis

Essential for mental health and social service professionals, this concise, readable guide presents a developmentally sound framework for strength-based intervention with parents and young children. It is filled with practical suggestions for building positive family relationships, cultivating parental knowledge and understanding of child development, enhancing family support systems.

Excerpt

What do you think of when you hear the term “early intervention”? Whom do you picture as the recipients of services? What is the nature of these services, and whom do you see delivering them and in what setting?

Since the passage of Public Law 99-457 in 1986, “early intervention” to many people has meant special education services to children with identifiable handicapping conditions. Certainly, that is one important segment of the field of early intervention; nevertheless, it is still only one aspect. In this book, we use the term “early intervention” to describe a much larger domain of services. Early intervention as discussed in this book encompasses many programs—often in health care, mental health, or human service settings—aimed at infants and toddlers who are considered to be at risk due to some condition of birth or circumstance (e.g., premature infants, children in poverty, infants born to parents who are chemically dependent or mentally ill).

The early intervention principles and strategies discussed throughout this volume will also be useful in parenting programs for the general public. Even healthy children born into stable, financially secure, wellfunctioning families can benefit from programs that provide their parents with emotional support, accurate information about child development, and a chance to explore their own underlying attitudes and beliefs about children and relationships. Taking a very broad perspective, early intervention also might be viewed as encompassing the field of child care. Not only do child care providers have a direct impact on the children in their care, but they are also in a powerful position to support and . . .

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