Scotland Re-Formed, 1488-1587

Scotland Re-Formed, 1488-1587

Scotland Re-Formed, 1488-1587

Scotland Re-Formed, 1488-1587

Synopsis

From the death of James III to the execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, Jane Dawson tells story of Scotland from the perspective of its regions and of individual Scots, as well as incorporating the view from the royal court. Scotland Re-formed shows how the country was re-formed as the relationship between church and crown changed, with these two institutions converging, merging and diverging, thereby permanently altering the nature of Scottish governance. Society was also transformed, especially by the feuars, new landholders who became the backbone of rural Scotland. The Reformation Crisis of 1559-60 brought the establishment of a Protestant Kirk, an institution influencing the lives of Scots for many centuries, and a diplomatic revolution that discarded the 'auld alliance' and locked Scotland's future into the British Isles. Although the disappearance of the pre-Reformation church left a patronage deficit with disastrous effects for Scottish music and art, new forms of cultural expression arose that reflected Protestant sensibilities or were transposed to secular settings. Alongside the dramatic events and slow transformations of cultural, social, economic, political and religious life, in 1587 much remained as it had been in 1488, with Scots deeply rooted in their country through their abiding sense of people and place. Key Features:
• Distinctive regional approach brings a fresh perspective to the century's political and religious events
• Compelling new interpretation based upon the complex inter-relationship of crown and church, helps students make sense of the upheavals brought to Scotland by the Renaissance and Reformation
• Careful integration of visual, artistic and material culture enlivens and enriches students' understanding of Scottish life

Excerpt

I have been able to write this book only because I have been standing on the shoulders of that amiable and generous giant, the community of all those interested in Scotland's history, to whom I owe more than can easily be expressed. I have a specific debt to Frances Dow, Elizabeth Ewan, Ken Emond, Norman Macdougall and Roger Mason, who commented on the draft of this volume and whose insights and coloured pens have greatly improved it: all remaining mistakes are my own. Roger has been an ideal series editor and a tower of strength throughout the book's long gestation. Following the revisions, Nancy Bailey worked her accustomed miracle by producing the final version of the text under immense time pressure. It is not possible to acknowledge everyone whose conversation, correspondence and unpublished papers have contributed over many years so greatly to my understanding. My warmest thanks go to them all, though they must forgive me for not mentioning them by name; the list would be very long indeed.

Since the 'tyranny of the lower margin' has been deliberately avoided in this volume, notes within chapters have been inserted only to reference direct quotations. the Further Reading points readers to the next step in their search for additional information and the select bibliography contains fuller bibliographical details. the constraints of space led to the pruning of a range of specialised sources and articles and, if anything essential has unintentionally been omitted, I apologise and hope this general acknowledgement of my debt to the scholarship of others will serve in its place.

Like many others, I have been admirably supported by the National Library of Scotland, in all its departments, and also by the holders of Scotland's other national collections, the National Archives of Scotland, the National Museum of Scotland, the National Galleries of Scotland . . .

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