Film Talk: Directors at Work

Film Talk: Directors at Work

Film Talk: Directors at Work

Film Talk: Directors at Work

Synopsis

What 1970s Hollywood filmmaker influenced Quentin Tarantino? How have contemporary Japanese horror films inspired Takashi Shimizu, director of the huge box office hit The Grudge? What is it like to be an African American director in the twenty-first century? The answers to these questions, along with many more little-known facts and insights, can be found in Film Talk, an in-depth, behind-the-scenes look at filmmaking from the 1940s to the present. In eleven intimate and revealing interviews, contemporary film directors speak frankly about their work - their successes and their disappointments, their personal aspirations, struggles, relationships, and the politics that affect the industry. A medley of directors including those working in pop culture and documentary, as well as feminist filmmakers, social satirists, and Hollywood mavericks recount stories that have never before been published.

Excerpt

Film Talk is a series of interviews with contemporary film directors from all aspects of the film medium: pop culture directors, documentary directors, feminist filmmakers, social satirists, and Hollywood mavericks. For the sake of convenience, I have organized this material into three distinct sections. “The Old Masters” include Ronald Neame and the late Val Guest, who created some of the most important and influential films of the Golden Age of British cinema, from Neame's The Horse's Mouth and Tunes of Glory, to Guest's science fiction classic The Day the Earth Caught Fire. Also included in this group are the late Budd Boetticher, who most notably directed a group of Westerns with Randolph Scott that influenced Sam Peckinpah's best works, and Albert Maysles, who along with his late brother, David, created some of the most important documentaries of the 1960s, including Salesman and What's Happening! The Beatles in the U.S.A.

The second section, “Cult Visions,” presents talks with Jack Hill, a Hollywood filmmaker whose 1970s action films have influenced Quentin Tarantino; Monte Hellman, the auteur of the minimalist masterpiece Two-Lane Blacktop; and Robert Downey Sr., whose social satires Putney Swope and Greaser's Palace paved the way for a generation of filmmakers to come. The final section, “New Voices,” features conversations with Takashi Shimizu, director of the huge box office hit The Grudge and a master of contemporary Japanese horror; Jamie Babbit, an outspoken lesbian director, whose But I'm a Cheerleader was done on a tiny budget and became a mainstream crossover hit; Bennett Miller, who made the low-budget digital film The Cruise before embarking on Capote, the film that put the director and his star, Philip Seymour Hoffman, firmly on the map; and Kasi Lemmons, whose Eve's Bayou is a classic of the contemporary African American cinema.

Here, these directors speak frankly about their work in conversations that are both intimate and revealing, offering valuable insights for the aspiring filmmaker as well as the general reader. Each director, naturally, had his or her . . .

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