Mindfulness and Acceptance: Expanding the Cognitive-Behavioral Tradition

Mindfulness and Acceptance: Expanding the Cognitive-Behavioral Tradition

Mindfulness and Acceptance: Expanding the Cognitive-Behavioral Tradition

Mindfulness and Acceptance: Expanding the Cognitive-Behavioral Tradition

Synopsis

Marsha Linehan - Recipient of the 2012 American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Application of Psychology!

This volume examines the role of mindfulness principles and practices in a range of well-established cognitive and behavioral treatment approaches. Leading scientist-practitioners describe how their respective modalities incorporate such nontraditional themes as mindfulness, acceptance, values, spirituality, being in a relationship, focusing on the present moment, and emotional deepening. Coverage includes acceptance and commitment therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, integrative behavioral couple therapy, behavioral activation, and functional analytic psychotherapy. In every chapter, the authors describe their clinical methods and goals, articulate their theoretical models, and examine similarities to and differences from other approaches both inside and outside behavior therapy.

Excerpt

The cognitive-behavioral therapy tradition (defined very broadly to include traditional behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, clinical behavior analysis, and so on) began in the 1950s and blossomed in the 1960s. In its lifetime, this tradition has been through many changes, yet has maintained its core commitments to science, theory, and good practice. In the last 10 years, a set of new behavior therapies has emerged that emphasizes issues that were traditionally less emphasized or even off limits for behavioral and cognitive therapists, including mindfulness, acceptance, the therapeutic relationship, values, spirituality, meditation, focusing on the present moment, emotional deepening, and similar topics. These have emerged from the most behavioral wings and the most cognitive wings of the tradition. They differ from what is more common in the behavior therapy tradition not only in their focus but also in their technology, which often seems unexpectedly experiential, involving secondorder change strategies, as well as more direct ones. Some involve sophisticated philosophy of science considerations. All are hard to characterize using the traditional distinctions between behavior therapy and other traditions, or those within the behavioral and cognitive tradition.

This is the first volume to try to examine that set of new developments and to ask some basic questions about it. Leading authors, researchers, and clinicians were brought together for a 3-day conference in Reno, Nevada, in the summer of 2002 to discuss all of these issues. They were asked to characterize their approaches clinically, and to consider how the focus of their approaches relates to the broader set of issues embraced by the new behavior therapies. They were asked to articulate their theoretical models, and examine their similarities and differences with other models both inside . . .

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