The Learning Leader: How to Focus School Improvement for Better Results

The Learning Leader: How to Focus School Improvement for Better Results

The Learning Leader: How to Focus School Improvement for Better Results

The Learning Leader: How to Focus School Improvement for Better Results

Synopsis

We can t do that in our school district. I don t have time to add that to my curriculum. We re fighting against impossible odds with these students. Effective school leadership does not have to be a losing battle. In The Learning Leader: How to Focus School Improvement for Better Results, Douglas B. Reeves helps leadership teams go beyond excuses to capitalize on their strengths and reduce their weaknesses. He introduces the Leadership for Learning Framework, which challenges readers to consider that student achievement is more than a set of test scores. Reeves asserts that when leaders focus exclusively on results, they fail to measure and understand the importance of their own actions. Instead, he encourages leaders to use the Leadership for Learning Framework to look deeper into their results. The framework helps leaders distinguish between Lucky educators, who achieve high results but don t understand their actions, and Leading educators, who achieve high results and understand how their actions influence their success. From conducting strategic planning to evaluating projects to organizing leadership teams, The Learning Leader will help leaders reconceptualize their leadership role and motivate their colleagues. Reeves urges teachers and administrators to become more efficient and focused leaders, but most important, he charges them to be better educators for their students.

Excerpt

The working title for this book was The Multiple Intelligences of Leadership. The book was conceived more than 20 years after Howard Gardner's groundbreaking work in this field, and it seemed a natural extension of his work. Just as intelligence is expressed in a variety of different ways, I reasoned, so leadership also has multiple expressions. The term “multiple intelligences” was widely accepted by many readers and it seemed a natural—perhaps I should have said an easy and palatable—extension of Gardner's ideas to the present study of leadership. As I reviewed the literature, organized my previous research, and conducted a new study on the practical implications of leadership on student achievement and educational equity, I realized that there were two problems with the prospective “multiple intelligences of leadership.” I had the wrong words and the wrong theory.

Having already agreed to address a distinguished national audience with the title The Multiple Intelligences of Leadership, I had two choices. I could gut it out and make it fit—after all, I am keenly aware of how soon books can be forgotten. Or I could confess to my . . .

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