International Handbook on the Continuing Professional Development of Teachers

International Handbook on the Continuing Professional Development of Teachers

International Handbook on the Continuing Professional Development of Teachers

International Handbook on the Continuing Professional Development of Teachers

Synopsis

Christopher Day and Judyth Sachs have done a remarkable job of pulling together an outstanding collection of essays on professional development that reflect its stunning diversity in different regions around the world. They have done for readers what no one else has accomplished in nearly a quarter century: Combine in a single volume a clear and concise description of professional development's past, present, and projected future internationally.
Thomas R. Guskey, University of Kentucky.

"an engaging text through out and can be dipped in to or read from beginning to end... The editors and authors of this book have done a great service to teachers and professional development educators worldwide" Journal of Inservice Education

This Handbook brings together theoretical and empirical research on purposes, policies and practices of teachers' continuing professional development (CPD) over the last twenty years.

It provides a unique collection of regional writing from key professionals in different regions of the world, featuring:

  • A review of current CPD literature
  • Discussion of the politics, policies and purposes of CPD
  • Case studies from Europe, USA, Australia, Asia, Africa and South America
  • A synthesis of research and future research possibilities
The book comprises a fascinating mix of conceptual framing, accounts of purposes and practices, case studies and analyses of best practice from a range of highly regarded writers in the field. It is an indispensable source book for policy makers and teachers at all levels of the education systems.

Contributors : Beatrice Avalos, Ray Bolam, Pam Christie, Marion Dadds, Christopher Day, John Elliott, Susan Groundwater-Smith, Shirley Grundy, Ken Harley, Alma Harris, Geert Kelchtermans, Geoff Lindsay, Judith Warren Little, Agnes McMahon, Daniel Muijs, Alan Penny, Judith Robison, Judyth Sachs, Ciaran Sugrue, David Tripp

Excerpt

Views of professional development for teachers vary widely. Some see it as everything that a learning experience should not be. It is brief and rarely sustained, deficit oriented, radically under-resourced, politically imposed rather than professionally owned, lacking in intellectual rigour or coherence, treated as an add-on rather than as part of a natural process and trapped in the constraints of a bureaucratic system that poses barriers to even modest levels of success. In short, it is an ill-designed, pedagogically naïve, demeaning exercise that often leaves participants more cynical and no more knowledgeable, skilled or committed than before.

Others, however, see professional development for teachers very differently. Although they recognize that what passes for professional development in many contexts may be naïve and uninspiring, in other contexts it is an essential intellectual and emotional endeavour that rests at the heart of dedicated efforts to improve the quality of education. In these contexts professional development for teachers uses our best knowledge about pedagogy, about professional renewal and growth, about individual commitment and about organizational life and change. It enhances the preparation of new teachers, renews the professional skills and enthusiasm of classroom veterans, even those who may feel disenchanted or disenfranchised, and improves the professional expertise, self-confidence and commitment of all. Amazingly, readers will find descriptions of professional development similar to both of these perspectives included in this handbook.

As editors, Christopher Day and Judyth Sachs have done a remarkable job of pulling together an outstanding collection of essays on professional development that reflect its stunning diversity in different regions around the world. They have done for readers what no one else has accomplished in nearly a quarter of a century: combined in a single volume a clear and concise description of professional development's past, present and projected future, internationally.

Readers are likely to have several reactions to these collected essays. Some will be discouraged by the many conflicts presented. Should professional development be about nurturing inquiry, self-reflection and individual professional identity, for example, or should it focus on compliance and conformity to specified reform agendas? Will improvements more likely arise from deepening teachers' understanding of how children learn or from clarifying expectations, defining standards, specifying practice and exercising sanctions?

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