Strange Prophecies Anew: Rereading Apocalypse in Blake, H.D., and Ginsberg

Strange Prophecies Anew: Rereading Apocalypse in Blake, H.D., and Ginsberg

Strange Prophecies Anew: Rereading Apocalypse in Blake, H.D., and Ginsberg

Strange Prophecies Anew: Rereading Apocalypse in Blake, H.D., and Ginsberg

Synopsis

"Focusing on cultural change, genre reinvention, and modern and postmodern approaches to language, "Strange Prophecies Anew": Rereading Apocalypse in Blake, H. D., and Ginsberg revives questions of religious and political authority in poetic prophecy. Prophets generally function as figures of dissent in religious and literary history; yet scholars tend toward readings that produce a consolidation of authority, a distinctly Miltonic visionary line and a select "visionary company." Tony Trigilio describes an alternative lineage, demonstrating that the prophetic poetries of William Blake, H. D., and Allen Ginsberg create a counter-history which resists religious and literary orthodoxy to such an extent that it revises the very tradition which authorizes it." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

God is the same God, always and everywhere…. In him are all things
contained and moved…. He is utterly void of all body and bodily
figure, and can therefore neither be seen, nor heard, nor touched…

Isaac Newton, Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy

Therefore God becomes as we are, that we may be as he is.

—William Blake, There is No Natural Religion [b]

[L]ibido is invariably and necessarily of a masculine nature, whether it
occurs in men or in women and irrespective of whether its object is a
man or a woman…. [A]n instinct is always active even when it has a
passive aim in view.

—Sigmund Freud, Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality

We can read my writing… as a suppressed desire for forbidden 'signs
and wonders,' breaking bounds, a suppressed desire to be a Prophetess,
to be important anyway… a hidden desire to found a new religion'

—H. D., Tribute to Freud

Do the homosexuals, like the Communists, intend to bury us?

—Life magazine, 26 June 1964

Moloch whose love is endless oil and stone! Moloch whose soul is elec
tricity and banks!… Moloch who entered my soul early! Moloch in
whom I am a consciousness without a body! Moloch who frightened me
out of my natural ecstasy! Moloch whom I abandon!

—Allen Ginsberg, Howl . . .

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