History of the Graeco-Latin Fable: The Fable during the Roman Empire and in the Middle Ages - Vol. 2

History of the Graeco-Latin Fable: The Fable during the Roman Empire and in the Middle Ages - Vol. 2

History of the Graeco-Latin Fable: The Fable during the Roman Empire and in the Middle Ages - Vol. 2

History of the Graeco-Latin Fable: The Fable during the Roman Empire and in the Middle Ages - Vol. 2

Synopsis

This is the second of three volumes covering the long history of the fable from Sumer to the present day. Historical evidence reaching as far back as Antiquity, supports the study of more than 500 works considered to be fables.

Excerpt

On the basis of the data in our Appendices, which will be referred to regularly in the form indicated in the introduction, we will establish a study of the primary metrical versions of the Hellenistic Age, beginning with those of which there is only a single specimen for each fable. Of course, the fact that we only know one primary metrical version does not mean that others could not also have existed, and have been lost to us. Let us look, for example, at what happens with H. 32 “The Murderer”. Important metrical remnants exist of this fable, with an Egyptian environment and concerning the punishment of evil, probably from the late Hellenistic period, after Cynicism (cf Vol. 1, pp. 635 ff); these remnants sometimes appear in AnF. I, sometimes in AnF. II (that is to say, the Augustana and Vindobonensis collections, respectively), sometimes in both; this can be proven in Appendix I, as it can in all the other cases from now on in which we make affirmations of this kind. If we only had the versions of this fable from the manuscript tradition, we might think that we were dealing with a unique primary version: Antiphanes, in AP XI 348, also makes reference to this fable, precisely in the form in which it appears in AnF.; since we are dealing with elegiac distichs, it is not surprising that no trace remains of the original verse. The GrenfellHunt Papyrus II 84 preserves the fable, in somewhat mutilated form and with a slightly different version, but, particularly, also with a different metre. There are two well preserved initial iambic trimetres and two final ones and remnants of verse in the central prose. Neither the trimetres nor these remnants agree with the verse of . . .
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