Standards for Our Schools: How to Set Them, Measure Them, and Reach Them

Standards for Our Schools: How to Set Them, Measure Them, and Reach Them

Standards for Our Schools: How to Set Them, Measure Them, and Reach Them

Standards for Our Schools: How to Set Them, Measure Them, and Reach Them

Synopsis

"A must read for those seeking high standards for all students. With unusual insight, the authors address the major issues, offering inspirational examples of schools that succeed." --Jerome T. Murphy, professor and dean, Harvard Graduate School of Education

This timely, tough-minded book shows how American public schools can be saved by instituting high standards for academic achievement. It explains not just what the standards movement is about and why it is important, but also what it will take to bring every student up to high standards, no matter where that student starts.

Tucker and Codding focus on empowering both students and adults by giving students the gift of high expectations and by giving school professionals the information, skills, authority and resources needed to do the job. They advocate building a standards-based instructional system, creating a results-oriented culture devoted to continuous improvement, and making the institution and the people in it accountable for reaching the goals set by the standards.

Excerpt

Harwich, Mass.—In this Cape Cod town where children
of service workers and the leisure class attend school together, a
substitute now teaches eighth-grade social studies. the regular
teacher, James Bougas, has been suspended for three weeks after
refusing to give a state exam.

Mr. Bougas is part of a growing antitest backlash that
challenges state officials to match reality to their rhetoric. Most
officials agree that tests tell only part of what we should know
about achievement. They concede that if the stakes attached to
tests are too high, schools may distort curriculums to prepare for
exams and little else. Policy makers recognize that it is more
expensive to assess high standards than the basics—it costs more
to score an essay than to scan bubble-in answers.

But in many states, testing ignores such complexity. Without
adjustments, the push for higher standards may be stalled or even
reversed.

Richard Rothstein
New York Times
May 30, 2001

When we wrote this book, our aim was to make the case for an idea, the idea that it is important to be clear about what we want students to achieve and then to commit ourselves unequivocally to making . . .

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