Adherence Issues in Sport and Exercise

Adherence Issues in Sport and Exercise

Adherence Issues in Sport and Exercise

Adherence Issues in Sport and Exercise

Excerpt

At the 1996 Annual Conference of the American Psychological Association in Toronto, a symposium was organised under the auspices of Division 47 (Exercise and Sport Psychology) by Britton Brewer which addressed adherence issues in sport and exercise. I was an invited presenter at that symposium which, in part, stimulated the idea for this book. Issues of adherence and compliance have long been of interest to psychologists in a variety of domains. As Meichenbaum and Turk (1987) pointed out, 'Ever since Hippocrates noted that patients often lie when they say they have taken their medicine, health care providers have been concerned with issues of patient compliance and nonadherence to treatment' (p. 11). Recent research has examined adherence/compliance concerns in relation to a variety of health behaviours such as depression (Frank, 1997), bulimic disorders (Waller, 1997), anger management (Mammen et al., 1997), postmyocardial infarction stress management (Trzcieniecka-Green and Steptoe, 1994), social phobia (Edelman and Chambless, 1995), sexual hypoactivity (Hulbert et al., 1995), medical controls in psychiatric disorders (Ruscher et al., 1997) and psychatric aftercare (Owen et al., 1997). Within this varied research, adherence concerns have been identified in relation to a variety of treatment modalities such as medication compliance, appointment keeping, homework completion, record keeping, and individual or group therapy programmes. The overriding message from the research is that adherence to these different modalities is a problem and that a wide range of personal and situational variables impinge on the adherence process.

In sport and exercise, academic and professional interest in the last 20 years has been focused very much on the problem of adherence to exercise and physical activity. Dishman (1988) published a landmark text which provided a state of the art review of theoretical models relating to exercise adherence, methods and strategies for behaviour intervention and various methodogical issues. In the preface, Dishman (1988) stated, 'It has been gratifying to see exercise adherence become a common topic of symposia . . .

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