Farewell, My Nation: The American Indian and the United States in the Nineteenth Century

Farewell, My Nation: The American Indian and the United States in the Nineteenth Century

Farewell, My Nation: The American Indian and the United States in the Nineteenth Century

Farewell, My Nation: The American Indian and the United States in the Nineteenth Century

Synopsis

Like its predecessor, the second edition of Philip Weeks's highly popular volume illuminates the problems caused by westward expansion in the nineteenth century, as battle after battle was fought, treaty after treaty was broken. Weeks discusses the three possible resolutions undertaken in varying degrees by the U. S. government -separation, concentration, and Americanization- as he guides the reader through the significant changes in Indian-White relations during this pivotal time.

Informed by the latest scholarship and expanded to consider the entire scope of U. S-Indian relations in the nineteenth century, the second edition of the engaging Farewell, My Nation provides important supplemental reading for the U. S history survey and essential text for courses in American Indian studies.

Excerpt

They could now get on with the task of burying the dead. For the previous three days, the last three of the old year, a ferocious winter storm had pummeled the upper plains. By the morning of New Year's Day, 1891, the blizzard had blown itself out and the sun began to break through the grey clouds. As the sky cleared, a train of wagons accompanied by individuals on horseback set out from Pine Ridge agency, situated near the southwestern corner of the Sioux's Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota. The party's destination was the valley of Wounded Knee Creek some twenty miles to the east. There, Sioux and troops of the U.S. Seventh Cavalry had battled on December 29, 1890, leaving twenty-five soldiers dead, thirty-nine wounded, and hundreds of Sioux either killed or severely wounded.

The Sioux who fell at Wounded Knee were followers of the Paiute mystic Wovoka, whose message combining Indian mysticism and Christian millennialism had found a substantial following among western tribes in the late 1880s. All Indians, Wovoka preached, must adopt a pacific lifestyle. They must put violence . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.