A Woman's Dilemma: Mercy Otis Warren and the American Revolution

A Woman's Dilemma: Mercy Otis Warren and the American Revolution

A Woman's Dilemma: Mercy Otis Warren and the American Revolution

A Woman's Dilemma: Mercy Otis Warren and the American Revolution

Synopsis

A loving wife and the mother of five sons, Warren accepted the validity of traditional female roles. She became a poet, political satirist, and playwright of the patriot cause. This book provides an analysis of one of the fascinating women to live in the era of the American Revolution.

Excerpt

As biographies offer access to the past, they reflect the needs of the present. Newcomers to biography and biographical history often puzzle over the plethora of books that some lives inspire. “Why do we need so many biographies of Abraham Lincoln?” they ask, as they search for the “correct” version of the sixteenth president's story. Each generation needs to revisit Lincoln because each generation has fresh questions, inspired by its own experiences. Collectively, the answers to these questions expand our understanding of Lincoln and America in the 1860s, but they also assist us to better comprehend our own time. People concerned with preserving such civil liberties as freedom of the press in time of national crisis have looked at Lincoln's approach to political opposition during and after secession. Civil rights activists concerned with racial injustice have turned to Lincoln's life to clarify unresolved social conflicts that persist more than a century after his assassination.

Useful as it is to revisit such lives, it is equally valuable to explore those often neglected by biographers. Almost always, biographies are written about prominent individuals who changed, in some measure, the world around them. But who is prominent and what constitutes noteworthy change are matters of debate. Historical beauty is definitely in the eye of the beholder. That most American biographies tell of great white males and their untainted accomplishments speaks volumes about the society that produced such uncritical paeans. More recently, women and men of various racial, religious, and economic backgrounds have expanded the range of American biography. The lives of prominent African-American leaders, Native American chieftains, and immigrant sweatshop workers who climbed the success ladder to its top now crowd onto those library shelves next to familiar figures.

In the American Biographical History Series, specialists in key areas of American History describe the lives of important men and women . . .

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