Eating the Ashes: Seeking Rehabilitation within the US Penal System

Eating the Ashes: Seeking Rehabilitation within the US Penal System

Eating the Ashes: Seeking Rehabilitation within the US Penal System

Eating the Ashes: Seeking Rehabilitation within the US Penal System

Synopsis

A rare view of the black depths and occasional rays of light in the evolution of US correctional practices. Having experienced some of the best and worst of penal design and theory, Ms. Compton shares the part that she has found to work, the part from which she managed to achieve survival and growth.

Excerpt

A growing number of writers are presenting the voices of incarcerated females. What is unique in Veronica Compton Wallace's work is the fact that she is the ultimate insider, as a long-term inmate herself. There is no danger of her “going native”; she is. There are truths shared by her fellow inmates and friends that might never be exposed to a researcher wearing a “visitor's” badge. She can tell us not only what a cell in “the hole” looks like, but what it feels like to call that isolation unit home for six months. She has witnessed and felt both the violence and the caring that occur 24-7 inside the wire. She knows what happens and doesn't happen after lights out. She knows where things have been hidden and how it's done. She learned first to survive, and then to lead in this mini-society that most people would rather not acknowledge. Veronica Compton Wallace did not arrive at The Washington Corrections Center for Women as a model prisoner by any means. Over the years, a transformation has occurred which has taken her from angry rebel to a tireless campaigner, teacher, and worker for her fellow inmates. This book tells her story and theirs.

The reader will do well to keep in mind that one inmate's perspective of a condition or an event does not always account for the big picture in a large institution. At any given time, numerous scenarios and dynamics are being played out which may give the impression, to an individual who feels put upon anyway, that her situation is unjust and out of control, when in fact it is the result of institutional priorities.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.