The Spirit of Ancient Egypt

The Spirit of Ancient Egypt

The Spirit of Ancient Egypt

The Spirit of Ancient Egypt

Excerpt

Man settled along the banks of the Nile River as long ago as 7000 BC; four millennia later, in this very region, he had learned to read, write, and develop and expand as a community. Over the next 3000 years, Egypt prospered despite hardships, internal conflicts and foreign invasion. Herodotus, the Greek historian who traveled to Egypt in the 5th century BC, called it “the gift of the Nile.”

Wind and water

The Nile is the source of all Egyptian life. Without that sacred river, all this land would have been barren, dried by the broiling sun and the wind. Rainfall gradually diminished in the area of Egypt, starting around the beginning of the third millennium BC; over time, it became almost non-existent. People began concentrating along the narrow strip of land on both sides of the river, where they survived by fishing, hunting, gathering, farming and breeding livestock. The remaining region was desert, known as deshret (“red land”) — an area that was regarded as sinister and perilous, and was often avoided. The black soil and the narrow colonized strip of land alongside the Nile was called khemet (“black land”); it provided a sharp contrast to the lifeless “red land.”

The Nile received its modern name from the Greeks, who referred . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.