Separation Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: An Individualized Approach to Assessment and Treatment

Separation Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: An Individualized Approach to Assessment and Treatment

Separation Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: An Individualized Approach to Assessment and Treatment

Separation Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: An Individualized Approach to Assessment and Treatment

Synopsis

"This indispensable book presents a readily accessible, research-based approach to understanding the unique challenges of separation anxiety and giving children and parents the skills they need to overcome it. Incorporating the proven concepts and methods of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), the authors' program is grounded in decades of hands-on clinical experience. Written in a lucid, down-to-earth style, this is a state-of-the-art guide for clinicians seeking to provide the best possible care to children, adolescents, and their families. Authoritative, highly practical, and rich with clinical wisdom, this book fills a key need for clinic- and school-based mental health practitioners working with children and families. An informative resource for students, it is an ideal supplemental text for graduate-level courses." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

It was not until the 1960s that psychotherapy began to deviate from a common and relatively uniform approach to treating psychopathology by tailoring treatments to specific psychological problems. Until that time the nature of psychopathology was ill defined and played little role in treatment planning. This changed rather dramatically during the 1970s and 1980s, beginning with the treatment of anxiety disorders and spreading across the full range of psychopathology as these problems became better delineated. It was, perhaps, DSM-III that first defined these concepts in enough detail to spark more broad-based attempts at designing treatments, both psychological and pharmacological, that would be especially effective in addressing the psychopathology at hand (Barlow, 1988). Ironically, the trend in the specification of treatments was more observable for what some are now calling “psychological treatments” (Barlow, in press) than for pharmacological treatments as individual treatment protocols appeared during the 1980s and 1990s for each of the disorders first articulated in DSM-III.

This trend began with Wolpe's (1958) description of systematic desensitization and continued in the 1970s with detailed descriptions of exposure-based treatments (Agras, Leitenberg, & Barlow, 1968; Marks, 1971). Systematic desensitization in particular sparked a flurry of research aimed at dismantling the effective ingredients in this welloperationalized procedure, and assessing with ever more precise measures the outcomes of this treatment. This in turn allowed psychotherapy investigators to begin refocusing research from an emphasis largely on process to one on outcomes (Barlow & Hersen, 1984; Hersen & Barlow, 1976). These developments resulted in a very healthy process . . .

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