Assessment of Addictive Behaviors

Assessment of Addictive Behaviors

Assessment of Addictive Behaviors

Assessment of Addictive Behaviors

Synopsis

This comprehensive clinical resource and text is grounded in cutting-edge knowledge about the biopsychosocial processes involved in addictive behaviors. Presented are research-based, eminently practical strategies for assessing the treatment needs and ongoing clinical outcomes of individuals who have problems with substance use and nonchemical addictions. From leading contributors, the book shows how to weave assessment through the entire process of care, from the initial screening to intervention, relapse prevention, and posttreatment monitoring.

Excerpt

Over a decade and a half ago, the introductory chapter for the first edition of this book dealt with the then “emergent” biopsychosocial model of addictive behaviors and its implications for their assessment. Much has happened in the addictions field since that time. We have a clearer and more thorough understanding of the genetic, biological, cognitive, psychological, and social factors that contribute to the development of addictive behaviors. We have a better understanding of how neurotransmitter systems and behavioral reinforcement principles interact and contribute to the experience of craving that motivates engagement in addictive behaviors and fosters the development of dependence. We have a better understanding of those behavioral and pharmacological interventions, used independently or in combination, that are effective in helping individuals achieve either abstinence-based or harm reduction goals. The biopsychosocial model has emerged and matured as an explanatory model that capably integrates this broad range of newly acquired knowledge about addictive behaviors and their treatment.

And yet, despite the many advances made over the past decade and a half, relapse continues to be one of the defining features of addictions and continues to occur at relatively high rates. The goal of treatment, regardless of its orientation, regardless of whether pharmacological or behavioral, is to reduce the likelihood of relapse and minimize the harm associated with a relapse if one does occur. Assessment of the individual's coping skills, cognitive expectations about the behavior and its perceived positive benefits and negative consequences, and situations that represent a high risk for relapse continue to serve as the cornerstone of treatment planning and relapse prevention. It is this latter point, in the broader context of the biopsychosocial model of addiction, that led to the development and organization of this revised and updated edition of Assessment of Addictive Behaviors.

A number of significant changes have been made in the present edition of this book. One of the most notable changes is the much more explicit focus on the relationship between assessment and relapse prevention processes and procedures. Assessment issues are now addressed in the context of relapse preven-

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