Handbook of Pediatric Psychology

Handbook of Pediatric Psychology

Handbook of Pediatric Psychology

Handbook of Pediatric Psychology

Synopsis

This volume provides a state-of-the-science review of research and practice at the interface of psychology and pediatric medicine. Sponsored by the Society of Pediatric Psychology, the Handbook comprises carefully structured, peer-reviewed chapters from recognized leaders in their respective areas. Current knowledge is presented on psychosocial aspects of a wide range of child and adolescent medical problems and developmental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. Evidence-based applications are described for promoting health, preventing disease and injury, and helping children and families cope with medical conditions and their treatment.

Excerpt

The growth of pediatric psychology has been a remarkable phenomenon. The conceptualizations, research, and practice activities initially included in the field remain central to the daily lives of pediatric psychologists as scientist-practitioners. These original conceptualizations have been expanded daily with a multitude of activities in research and practice. This expansion is important for a vital and developing clinical profession built on empirical science. Notably, as a reflection of the field, this third edition builds on the foundations of the first two editions (Routh, 1988; Roberts, 1995), while adding some new concepts and topics. Thus this Handbook has continued to evolve to include newer aspects, as well as what may be understood as “traditional” pediatric psychology.

As with the second edition, I formed an advisory panel of experts in the field and solicited their ideas for topics and organization, including continuing or changing authors, and continuing, combining, expanding, or adding new topics, all while keeping the length similar to that of the previous edition. It is always interesting to see what professionals, scientists and clinicians, think is part of their field. Indeed, not all pediatric psychologists see the same things in the field as interesting and important (see, e.g., Brown & Roberts, 2000). Some panelists and authors commented that they would not have included certain topics in this volume because they personally have no interest in one or another topic, while wanting more space for their own interests. I valued their comments and perspectives, but ultimately I, as editor, had the final say in the contents and framework. In developing the book's outline and the topical coverage of the chapters, the advisory panel and I tried to take an openminded perspective and include the diversity of activities and interests within pediatric psychology. The selection of topics and allocation of pages represents as much of the range of the field as we could put into the space available.

A handbook of this type can attempt to be comprehensive, but space limitations (and the need to keep the book's cost to a reasonable amount) inevitably constrain what could eventually be a multivolume set. All chapter authors suffered under these page constraints; each wanted much more space to cover essential topics. The reviewers and I tried to delete all such lamentations in the chapters because every author was under the same restrictions. Noting the page limits and remarking that there are other topics to cover takes up space, and it is simply a fact of life that we never get adequate space to cover all the things we ever want to include. I promised the authors that I would note here that severe space require-

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