E-Learning 2.0: Proven Practices and Emerging Technologies to Achieve Real Results

E-Learning 2.0: Proven Practices and Emerging Technologies to Achieve Real Results

E-Learning 2.0: Proven Practices and Emerging Technologies to Achieve Real Results

E-Learning 2.0: Proven Practices and Emerging Technologies to Achieve Real Results

Synopsis

A fool-proof guide to the good, the bad and the ugly about e-learning and how to make it work for any company. When executed well, e-learning is a powerful way for organizations to save money while providing the kind of up-to-date training and information that will help employees perform better and more efficiently. Unfortunately, all too often, companies are finding that they're spending a huge amount of money for less return than they had hoped. In e-Learning 2.0, Anita Rosen explains what works and what doesn't, offering businesses a best-practices guide for making their investment pay off. Using examples of successful companies like National SemiConductor, Telefonica and the Texas Department of Transportation who have made the most of e-learning, Rosen shows companies how to:
• define an e-learning strategy
• identify the best technologies and processes to effectively implement an e-learning strategy
• manage large, complicated, or new e-learning initiatives
• get buy-in from trainers, managers and learners
• measure and evaluate training
• calculate an ROIComplete with up-to-date information on the latest technologies, including Web 2.0, this book will help businesses improve their performance without breaking the bank.

Excerpt

For more than a decade, e-learning has been touted as the next big thing in training. Yet most organizations are still trying to figure out how to make it work. Perhaps part of the problem is that e-learning is a type of training or learning in which instructors and students interact at different times and in different spaces, with technology bridging the timespace gap and allowing learners to access training at their own pace and with methods that are convenient for them. A lot of companies have spent a lot of money creating a lot of projects—but they have not gotten what they thought they would get out of their investment in this still new technology.

Meanwhile, corporate training organizations are looking for better returns than they are currently receiving from their e-learning investment. While department-level personnel wait for executives to provide vision and goals, executives want trainers to develop a business plan to move training into the twenty-first century. Along the way, corporations spend billions of dollars on solutions selected on an ambiguous direction that is provided primarily by product vendors. Specifically, corporations . . .

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