Interpreting the Psalms

Interpreting the Psalms

Interpreting the Psalms

Interpreting the Psalms

Synopsis

Patrick D. Miller seeks to help interpreters of the Psalms "find entrée into them in various ways to hear their theological claims and their point of contact with human life." In Part One, Miller examines the dominant "general approaches" that are currently shaping the study of psalms. He pays special attention to the poetic features of the psalms so as to aid the task of understanding their meaning. In Part Two, he offers extended expositions of ten specific Psalms 1, 2, 14, 22, 23, 82, 90, 127, 130, and 139. These Psalms are interpreted with an eye to theological and pastoral issues and with a sensitivity to their features and to their significance as Christian Scripture.

Excerpt

The psalms of the Old Testament belong to the earliest memories of my childhood when our family would gather on Sunday afternoons to read, memorize, and sing them. It was not an occasion that my sisters and I particularly relished. When we were given the opportunity to choose a psalm to memorize or read, invariably we chose Psalm 117 or Psalm 133, for the obvious reason of brevity—besides, we were fascinated with the oil running down Aaron's beard! The lessons, however, took. Not only have the psalms been present on family occasions through the years—trips, marriages, deaths—as they have been for countless other family circles, but they have become for me both an important part of the corporate worship of the people of God and a central preoccupation in my study and teaching of the Old Testament. Worship with the psalms and study of the psalms came especially close together during a sabbatical year in Cambridge, England. I frequently attended morning worship or evensong in the college chapels and heard the psalms beautifully sung in cycle; at the same time most of my hours in the study were spent with the psalms.

It is in the conviction that the psalms belong both at the center of the life and worship of Christian congregations and in the midst of the personal pilgrimage that each of us makes under the shadow of the Almighty, that I have written this book. Its audience is most obviously pastors and teachers in the church as well as those who may not have such official functions but love to read and study the psalms for whatever light they have to shed on their way in the world.

Part 1 of the book is designed to help interpreters of the psalms find . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.