Everyday Talk: Building and Reflecting Identities

Everyday Talk: Building and Reflecting Identities

Everyday Talk: Building and Reflecting Identities

Everyday Talk: Building and Reflecting Identities

Synopsis

"The book draws on discourse analytic research and applies it to a wide range of real-life situations and examples including private conversations among friends and family as well as interchanges in the classroom, workplace, and public settings. Interweaving rhetorical and cultural perspectives, the author gives particular attention to the ways talk reflects communicators' cultural and ethnic background, nationality, social class, and gender, as well as the dynamics between particular conversational partners. Illuminated is the complex role that talking plays in building relationships and creating - and ideally, resolving - relational problems." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

This book grew out of my own fascination with talk and my belief that knowing how to listen to and analyze talk is fundamental to understanding communication. Language has always been part of the study of communication, but language only partly overlaps with talk. Language is an abstract code; talk is a, if not the, focal activity of ordinary life. Talking is how we express who we are and who we want to be; it is how we make relationships as well as relational problems; it is the instrument that creates, exacerbates, and—not quite as often as we'd like—solves troubles. At work, in public meetings, and in everyday social occasions talk is what we do. the examples of everyday talk that I use in this book are taken from studies appearing in discourse-analytic journals and books, as well as from my own research and teaching materials. Whenever I could find suitable instances, I have used actually occurring instances of talk to illustrate the point being made; however, when I could not, I invented exchanges that seemed plausible. Introductory text to examples will make clear if an exchange is real or imagined.

One goal in writing the book was to move the findings of discourse analysis—a rich, interesting, and too often overlooked area of study— into the mainstream of communication coursework. I am assuming that college students will be the book's main audience. I am also assuming that some students will be reading the text with no prior coursework in communication. As such, core concepts are explained with key vocabulary highlighted, and each chapter has a preview and summary. in addition, references are used sparingly in the body of the text. Although the intended focal audience is undergraduate students, the book is designed to be useful to novice scholars (graduate students and academics new to discourse studies) as well. To facilitate scholarly engagement, there are . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.