Advances in Personality Science

Advances in Personality Science

Advances in Personality Science

Advances in Personality Science

Synopsis

Leading investigators present novel insights and findings from a wide array of disciplines, illuminating -- and often reformulating -- fundamental questions about the nature of personhood. They shed new light on the nature and origins of personality and individual differences, and challenge many traditional assumptions.

Excerpt

This volume originated at the inaugural conference of the Association for Research in Personality, held in San Antonio, Texas, in 2001. The conference featured a particularly telling moment. In remarks to attendees, the president of the Association, David Watson of the University of Iowa, requested a show of hands: “How many of you consider yourself to be traditional personality psychologists?” Very few hands went up (though scattered catcalls directing one or another member to stick their hands in the air could be heard). More remarkable than the response—“traditional” having such a negative connotation in this context—was Watson's prescience in asking the question.The audience was committed to advancing a psychology of personality. But the traditional subfield of personality psychology, he discerned, seemed insufficient to the task.

A second conference happening also speaks to the rationale for this volume. A number of presenters began by noting that they had “never been to a personality conference before.” Yet their presentations inevitably addressed the most central questions in the study of personality. It was only arbitrary disciplinary boundaries that had separated their work from discourse in the traditional field. The presenters attacked questions of individuality and individual differences by drawing on bodies of knowledge in diverse disciplines: molecular genetics, child and lifespan developmental psychology, historical analyses of social change, mathematical analyses of nonlinear dynamical systems, neuroscience, evolutionary psychology, social cognition—as well as methods originating in the psychology of personality. Even more striking than the diversity and range of methods were the underlying unities—the common concerns—that seemed to motivate so much of the research: an attempt to understand, in detail, how interactions among biological and psychological systems and between persons and the environments in which they develop give rise to the enduring behavioral and affective expressions that define the individual and distinguish individuals from one another. Latent within the superficially . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.