Theories of Development

Theories of Development

Theories of Development

Theories of Development

Synopsis

An important new text, this volume surveys the leading theories and models of economic and social development. Chapters examine sociological, economic, neo-Marxist, poststructuralist, feminist, and radical democratic approaches, as well as an array of development models including determinism, modernization, dependency, and neoliberalism. Reaching conclusions at odds with much of the recent literature, this volume is critical of neo-liberal, market-driven economic growth, arguing instead that an alternative, democratic form of development remains a viable possibility.

Excerpt

This book began as a rewrite of Global Capitalism, published by Routledge in 1991. But it quickly became far more than that. Indeed, we retained only a few paragraphs from the earlier work. There are four new chapters, while the other three now display only vestiges of their former contents. The book is much more a critical survey of the main theories of development than a geography of global capitalism, although the intent remains one of explaining differences in the spatial distribution of wealth and poverty. We wrote the book during a period of transformation in the global economy, a period when the “new” international division of labor entered middle-aged crisis, while the “certainties” of the past thirty years were becoming increasingly precarious, when the economic “miracles” of East Asia and Latin America became mirages almost overnight. During this time, the need for fundamental understanding, the need for reexamining the great attitudinal paradigms of development, took on new significance. This lent our work an urgency which, we hope, spills over onto its pages, lending the contents some semblance, at least, of the seriousness we felt in writing them.

Despite its somewhat strange designation of authorship, Richard Peet with Elaine Hartwick, this book results from long collaboration between what is now a wife and husband partnership. Specifically, Elaine wrote most of Chapter 6, while Richard wrote most of the rest. More generally the book results from many conversations and collaborations stretching over spaces and times scattered across the last fifteen years of our friendship. The designation “with” is the consequence of Elaine's New England reticence for accepting “credit” for that which she did not write directly. “Authorship” should actually include many others for, as quickly becomes apparent, we draw on the work of dozens of writers in a synthetic statement which tries to represent the finest ideas . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.