Korematsu v. United States: Japanese-American Internment

Korematsu v. United States: Japanese-American Internment

Korematsu v. United States: Japanese-American Internment

Korematsu v. United States: Japanese-American Internment

Synopsis

"Describes the historical context of the Korematsu versus United States Supreme Court Case, detailing the claims made by both sides and the outcome, and including excerpts from the Supreme Court justices' decisions and relevant sidebars"--Provided by publisher.

Excerpt

Is it true, that the moment a declaration of war is
made, the executive department of this government,
without an act of Congress, becomes absolute master
of our liberties and our lives? Are we, then, subject to
martial rule, administered bγ the President upon his
own sense of the exigency, with nobody to control him,
and with every magistrate and every authority in the
land subject to his will alone?

———Attorney David Dudley Field in Ex parte Milligan

THE U.S. CONSTITUTION is based on the concept of government under law. Under this system, the military cannot legitimately imprison civilians without review by civil courts. Even during war, the Constitution protects citizens against imprisonment without charges or trial. Yet such imprisonment was forced on 110,000 Japanese Americans on the West Coast during World War II. With the sanction of the president and Congress, the military removed these men, women, and children—most of whom were American citizens—from their homes and forced them to live in internment camps under armed guard. The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 1944 decision, Korematsu v.

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