Organizational Effectiveness and Improvement in Education

Organizational Effectiveness and Improvement in Education

Organizational Effectiveness and Improvement in Education

Organizational Effectiveness and Improvement in Education

Excerpt

ALMA HARRIS, NIGEL BENNETT AND MARGARET PREEDY

Educational effectiveness is very much on the political, research and practitioner agenda. Over the last few years there has been sustained pressure upon educational institutions to improve performance, to become more efficient and more effective. Familiar terms such as 'equal opportunities' and 'equality' have been extended to include words such as 'standards', 'ambition', 'diversity' and 'accountability'. These words are all part of the vocabulary of educational efficiency, effectiveness and improvement.

The arrival of the quasi-market has heightened competition between schools and colleges in the UK. Consequently, the measurement of institutional effectiveness and improvement has become increasingly more important. These developments have had far-reaching implications for the practice of educational management. Schools and colleges have been required to take increasing management responsibility and they have also experienced greater accountability in more varied and complex ways. The net result of this has been the demand for higher-level management skills within the educational sphere. Moreover, there has been a diffusing of management tasks and roles within educational institutions. As the management task becomes more complex, most teachers and lecturers have found themselves involved in some form of management activity.

A model of management premised upon hierarchical structures is no longer appropriate to the management tasks which most educational institutions currently face. Flatter organizations are emerging where responsibility is more widely shared. This implies that management is to be performed as part of the work of all staff in varying capacities. Therefore, effective management should be central to the professional development of all teachers and lecturers irrespective of their position within the organization.

The main aim of this book is to make management theory accessible and of practical use for teachers and lecturers. Consequently, the chapters collectively emphasize 'theory in practice' and focus upon ideas which are useful in the pursuit of effective educational management. This volume subscribes to the view that there are aspects of . . .

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