Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved

Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved

Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved

Primates and Philosophers: How Morality Evolved

Excerpt

In the Tanner Lectures on Human Values that became the lead essay in this book, Frans de Waal brings his decades of work with primates, and his habit of thinking deeply about the meaning of evolution, to bear upon a fundamental question about human morality. Three distinguished philosophers and a prominent student of evolutionary psychology then respond to the way de Waal's question is framed, and to his answer. Their essays are at once appreciative of de Waal's endeavor and critical of certain of his conclusions. De Waal responds to his critics in an afterword. While there is considerable disagreement among the five essayists about both the question and how to answer it, they also share a good deal of common ground. First, all contributors to this book accept the standard scientific account of biological evolution as based on random natural selection. None suggests that there is any reason to suppose that humans are different in their metaphysical essence from other animals, or at least, none base their arguments on the idea that humans uniquely possess a transcendent soul.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.