The Digital Person: Technology and Privacy in the Information Age

The Digital Person: Technology and Privacy in the Information Age

The Digital Person: Technology and Privacy in the Information Age

The Digital Person: Technology and Privacy in the Information Age

Synopsis

"The Digital Personchallenges the existing ways in which law and legal theory approach the social, political, and legal implications of the collection and use of personal information in computer databases. Solove's book is ambitious, and represents the most important publications in the field of information privacy law for some years." - Georgetown Law Journal

"Anyone concerned with preserving privacy against technology's growing intrusiveness will find this book enlightening." - Publishers Weekly

"Solove... truly understands the intersection of law and technology. This book is a fascinating journey into the almost surreal ways personal information is hoarded, used, and abused in the digital age." - The Wall Street Journal

"Daniel Solove is one of the most energetic and creative scholars writing about privacy today.The Digital Personis an important contribution to the privacy debate, and Solove's discussion of the harms of what he calls 'digital dossiers' is invaluable." - Jeffrey Rosen, author of The Unwanted Gaze and The Naked Crowd

"Powerful theme." - Privacy Journal

"This is not only a book you should read, but you should make sure your friends read it." - IEEE Review

"Solove offers a book that is both comprehensive and easy to understand, discussing the changes that technology has brought to our concept of privacy. An excellent starting point for much needed discussion." - Law Technology News

"An unusually perceptive discussion of one of the most vexing problems of the digital age- our loss of control over our personal information. It's a fascinating journey into the almost surreal ways personal information is hoarded, used, and abused in the digital age. I recommend his book highly." - Bruce Schneier

"Solove's book is the best exposition thus far about the threat that computer databases containing personal data about millions of Americans poses for information privacy." - Pamela Samuelson, Chancellor's Professor of Law and Information Management at the University of California, Berkeley

"Solove drives his points home through considerable reconfiguration of the basic argument. Rather than casting blame or urging retreat to a precomputer database era, the solution is seen in informing individuals, challenging data collectors, and bringing the law up-to-date." - Choice

"If you want to find out what a mess the law of privacy is, how it got that way, and whether there is hope for the future, then read this book." - Legal Times

"Solove evaluates the shortcomings of current approaches to privacy as well as some useful and controversial ideas for striking a new balance. Anyone who deals with privacy matters will find a lot ot consider." - DM News

"Solove's treatment of this particular facet is thoughtful, thorough, concise, and occasionally laced with humor. The present volume gives us reason to look forward to his future contributions." - The Law and Politics Book Review

"Solove's book is useful, particularly as an overview on how these private and government databases grew in sophistication and now interact with one another." - Christian Science Monitor

"A far-reaching examination of how digital dossiers are shaping our lives. Daniel Solove has persuasively reconceptualized privacy for the digital age. A must-read." &#

Excerpt

We are in the midst of an information revolution, and we are only beginning to understand its implications. The past few decades have witnessed a dramatic transformation in the way we shop, bank, and go about our daily business—changes that have resulted in an unprecedented proliferation of records and data. Small details that were once captured in dim memories or fading scraps of paper are now preserved forever in the digital minds of computers, in vast databases with fertile fields of personal data. Our wallets are stuffed with ATM cards, calling cards, frequent shopper cards, and credit cards—all of which can be used to record where we are and what we do. Every day, rivulets of information stream into electric brains to be sifted, sorted, rearranged, and combined in hundreds of different ways. Digital technology enables the preservation of the minutia of our everyday comings and goings, of our likes and dislikes, of who we are and what we own. It is ever more possible to create an electronic collage that covers much of a person's life—a life captured in records, a digital person composed in the collective computer networks of the world.

We are currently confronting the rise of what I refer to as “digital dossiers.” A dossier is a collection of detailed data about an individual. Dossiers are used in European courts to assemble information . . .

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