The Manager's Guide to Maximizing Employee Potential: Quick and Easy Strategies to Develop Talent Every Day

The Manager's Guide to Maximizing Employee Potential: Quick and Easy Strategies to Develop Talent Every Day

The Manager's Guide to Maximizing Employee Potential: Quick and Easy Strategies to Develop Talent Every Day

The Manager's Guide to Maximizing Employee Potential: Quick and Easy Strategies to Develop Talent Every Day

Synopsis

William Rothwell honored with ASTD Distinguished Contribution Award in Workplace Learning and Performance.


Many books have been written about talent management and succession planning - but few have focused on how busy managers can incorporate the important task of finding, developing, and keeping the best people into their daily routine. The Manager's Guide to Maximizing Employee Potential takes readers step-by-step through simple and effective strategies they can use to:


• Assess individual potential

• Recruit and select the right people

• Train and develop talent

• Offer career advice and mentoring

• Appraise current skills and provide daily feedback

• Excel at performance coaching

• Transfer knowledge and professional contacts

• And much more


Aimed at managers at all levels - and featuring real-world examples - this indispensable guide explains why managers, not the HR department, must take the lead in attracting, cultivating, and retaining the most productive, promotable people... and arms them with the practical skills they need to do it... every day.

Excerpt

What do you, as a manager, have to do with recruiting, developing, and retaining talent? the short answer is simple: you have everything to do with those activities. It is not the human resource (HR) department's job to manage talent. Although hr professionals do have parts to play in talent management—and so do CEOs, top managers, and even individuals—it is not the hr department's job to build talent on a daily basis. One reason is simply that managers see workers all the time, while hr professionals interact with them on fewer occasions. Because most talent development occurs on the job and not in training classrooms off the job, it just makes sense to conclude that each worker's supervisor bears a major responsibility for talent management. Therefore, this book focuses on the tactical, rather than the strategic, issues involved in how talent is managed and developed.

Of course, many managers claim they are simply too busy getting the work out to recruit, develop, and retain talent. But managing talent is what they should be doing routinely; it should not be considered an additional or onerous task. It is the essence of what management is all about. To do this properly, managers must simultaneously complete the day's work while still preparing employees for the future. Doing that requires skillful juggling.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.