Facilitating Project Performance Improvement: A Practical Guide to Multi-Level Learning

Facilitating Project Performance Improvement: A Practical Guide to Multi-Level Learning

Facilitating Project Performance Improvement: A Practical Guide to Multi-Level Learning

Facilitating Project Performance Improvement: A Practical Guide to Multi-Level Learning

Synopsis

Waiting until the end of a project to identify "lessons learned" is too late. By that time, the project may be ready for the scrap heap. But if your projects and programs include multi-level learning, you'll not only be fostering continuous improvements for the future, you'll be well-equipped to reduce the risk of failure while projects are "in-flight" so you can deliver maximum value to your client organization. Facilitating Project Performance Improvement helps any organization:


• Reduce time to market for new products, systems, processes and technologies

• Improve customer and end-user satisfaction with project outcomes

• Reduce risk of failure, wasted investment, and project runaway

• Improve productivity, quality and teamwork

• Continuously improve delivery both within and across projects.


Organizations simply cannot afford to leave learning to chance on their mission-critical investments. Facilitating Project Performance Improvement provides a practical approach to structured learning and reflectionthat enables teams to innovate and improve, ensuring both immediate and long-term project success.

Excerpt

Projects are the vehicle for transforming the modern global corporation. They are the means by which businesses achieve leaner cost structures, more effective operations, and better IT. They are the means by which companies develop new products and execute new business strategies. When projects succeed, they deliver revenue growth, improved productivity, lower costs, more efficient operations, and higher market valuations. When they fail, they drain critical investment dollars, waste valuable resources, and—directly or indirectly—limit a firm's ability to compete.

While projects are vital to organizational growth, renewal, and success, project work is fraught with uncertainty, risk, and ever-changing internal and external conditions. Every project and each phase of every project presents new problems and challenges that require managers and teams to plan, act, and adjust. Organizational priorities may change as new managers rotate into and out of roles. External economic conditions may change, making some projects more urgent and eliminating the need for others altogether. Requirements for new products or software applications may change in midstream as customers and stakeholders learn more about what they really need. Mergers and acquisitions, divestitures, joint ventures, and new strategic initiatives create discontinuities and place new demands on the organization and its top talent, drawing away resources at critical times (Dai, 2002).

In addition to navigating a changing social and political landscape, people at all levels must increasingly learn to work with new people, new technologies, and new business processes across different time zones, cul-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.