Reconfiguring Families in Contemporary Vietnam

Reconfiguring Families in Contemporary Vietnam

Reconfiguring Families in Contemporary Vietnam

Reconfiguring Families in Contemporary Vietnam

Synopsis

Reconfiguring Families in Contemporary Vietnam chronicles and analyzes the most significant change for families in Vietnam's recent past - the transition to a market economy, referred to as Doi Moi in Vietnamese and generally translated as the "renovation". Two decades have passed since the wide-ranging institutional transformations that took place reconfigured the ways families produce and reproduce. The downsizing of the socialist welfare system and the return of the household as the unit of production and consumption redefined the boundaries between the public and private.

This volume is the first to offer a multidisciplinary perspective that sets its gaze exclusively on processes at work in the everyday lives of families, and on the implications for gender and intergenerational relations. By focusing on families, this book shifts the spotlight from macro transformations of the renovation era, orchestrated by those in power, to micro-level transformations, experienced daily in households between husbands and wives, parents and children, grandparents and other family members.

Excerpt

Danièle Bélanger and Magali Barbieri

Vietnamese families have experienced dramatic and transformative events through the country's social, political, and economic history between the colonial period and current times. Indeed, historical benchmarks, such as colonization, independence, socialism, collectivization, the American War, the end of the Cold War, and the transition to a market economy have all resulted in far-reaching changes for family life. At the same time, families, through their agency and the deployment of myriad strategies, have also given shape and direction to these major historical events and social mutations. Among the numerous important events in Vietnam's contemporary history, two dates stand out as particularly significant for Vietnamese families: first, the formation of an independent socialist state in the North in 1954 and, second, the official adoption of a market-oriented economic system in 1986. the respective institutional and moral environments brought about by these two “transitions” meant that families had to adjust, adapt, negotiate, and accommodate to new settings and imperatives of daily life. Several significant events are comingled in these two major transformations. These include the 1945–54 Colonial War, followed by independence and the partition between North and South in 1954, which separated entire families for two decades; the wars fought in Cambodia, against the United States, and at the Chinese border that took millions of men and women away from home either temporarily or permanently; and the end of the American War . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.