God and the Excluded: Visions and Blind Spots in Contemporary Theology

God and the Excluded: Visions and Blind Spots in Contemporary Theology

God and the Excluded: Visions and Blind Spots in Contemporary Theology

God and the Excluded: Visions and Blind Spots in Contemporary Theology

Synopsis

Reiger offers an enlightening way to understand the chief strands or options in theology today & a valuable proposal for resituating theology in light of global market & the crucial issue of inclusion of those left out of today's "gated community".

Excerpt

Doing theology in the tension between God and people who are excluded goes against the grain. For centuries theology has assumed that connections to people who are excluded from the mainstream on the grounds of class, race, gender, and other marks of difference are optional. in the contemporary North American context, middle-class theology continues to act as if interaction with impoverished people is optional; white theology acts as if interaction with African Americans and other ethnic minorities is optional; male theology assumes that interaction with women is optional; and similar attitudes are perpetuated in many other places of privilege around the globe. Why should theology as a whole be reconsidered in relation to God and people at the margins now? in this book I take up four major modes of contemporary theology and develop this question into a new constructive theological vision.

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, more so than ever before, it seems that we have managed to render invisible both people at the margins and the powers that hold them there. Although the boom of the economy and other recent success stories may have passed many of us by, most mainline theologians and church people are not forced to face the recesses of suffering at the margins of the global economy and in the ghettoes of our cities. My position as a tenured theologian at a major theological school, as well as the fact that I am male, white, middle class, and from a European background, seems to ensure that I can avoid seeing—let alone being among—the excluded. It also seems to entitle me to continue to do theology as usual.

But what if the growing pain and suffering of large parts of humanity, both at home and around the globe, affect all of us, including the way we do theology? What if we are already located somewhere between God and . . .

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