Eating Landscape: Aztec and European Occupation of Tlalocan

Eating Landscape: Aztec and European Occupation of Tlalocan

Eating Landscape: Aztec and European Occupation of Tlalocan

Eating Landscape: Aztec and European Occupation of Tlalocan

Excerpt

The central question of this book is: How do people meaningfully occupy the land? While there are features of a landscape that are intrinsic to it (for example, fertility, minerals, bodies of water, animals, native plants, human beings, etc.), the meaning of land, and by that I mean a series of understandings that determine the character of a human relationship with land (and its other inhabitants), is widely variable. Using distinctive meanings of land as a central focus highlights religious consequences of occupying land. First, distinctive inhabitants necessarily develop a “hermeneutics of occupation,” or an understanding of an appropriate human relationship to the material world. Second, an interpretation of particular lands substantiates and challenges assumed understandings held by people who inhabit meaningful places. Third, particular kinds of interpretations of other beings (humans or others) are generated from different hermeneutical perspectives with respect to land. How a human community understands its appropriate relationship with the material world will reflect how it understands its relationship with other beings.

My case for examining these issues is contained in rituals to Tlaloc, a pan-Mesoamerican deity of rain and fertility, who is often described as a coherent bodily reality in the pre-Columbian landscape of the . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.